Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International Conference and Exhibition on Natural & Alternative Medicine Beijing, China .

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Day 2 :

OMICS International Alternative Medicine 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Pierluigi Pompei photo
Biography:

Pierluigi Pompei is working as an Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Pharmacotherapy and Sport Nutrition, Dept. of Experimental Medicine and Public Health, University of Camerino. He is author of over 50 international publications on peer-reviewed journals, several chapters of scientific books, has 1 international patent, and attended hundreds of conferences and meetings.

Abstract:

Insulin-resistance (IR) is defined as the inability of a known quantity of exogenous or endogenous insulin to increase glucose uptake and utilization. Several mechanisms have been proposed as possible causes underlying the development of IR and the insulin resistance syndrome. Ir occurs as part of a cluster of cardiovascular-metabolic abnormalities commonly referred to as “the metabolic syndrome”. This may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, accelerated atherosclerosis, hypertension, dysmenorrheal, hirsutism, and polycystic ovarian syndrome depending on the genetic background of the individual developing the insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to assess, in 123 female and 35 male (mean age 42±10.3, range 19-75) volunteers, whether IR could be partly related to a dietary sugar intolerance and whether there could be a correlation between the alcat intolerance test and a mutation of the tcftl2 gene (it promotes the trascription of the pro-glucagone and plays a key role in the development of the langherans islands). Results evidenced that subjects with an intolerance to sugar, have also shown a statistically significant complete or incomplete alteration of the tcftl2 genetic test. Based upon these findings, our study demonstrated that there is a clinical correlation between the alcat food intolerance test and the IR. The positivity to the alcat test of one of the sugars tested (fructose, sugar cane and sugar beet) indicates, in the majority of the subjects, the presence of a mutation of the gene tcf7l2 and could contribute to the prevention and treatment of the IR.

OMICS International Alternative Medicine 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Grace Y Sun photo
Biography:

Grace Y Sun emeritus obtained BS in Chemistry from Seattle Pacific University and PhD in Biochemistry from Oregon State University. After holding a Research Scientist position in Cleveland for 7 years, she was recruited to the Biochemistry Department in University of Missouri. As an internationally renowned neuroscientist, she is recognized for her research on brain lipids and signaling pathways in relation to neurodegenerative diseases and aging. Her research experience included serving as Director of the MU Alzheimer’s disease research program and project leader in the MU Center for Phytonutrient and Phytochemistry. She is a founding member and Scientific Director for the newly established Center for Translational Neurosciences (CTN) in the MU School of Medicine. Besides training a large number of graduate students and Post-docs, she also is experienced in organizing national and international symposia and meetings. She has published over 300 articles in highly regarded journals. Among the many awards, she received University of Missouri System President’s Award for Sustained Excellence in 2012, which was the highest award recognizing faculty achievement at the University.

Abstract:

Microglial cells are the major immune active cells in the brain playing multiple functional roles for maintaining brain health. Besides scavenging cellular debris, these cells become activated in response to injury and release pro-inflammatory and other factors that affect neighboring cells. Activation of microglia has been implicated in a number of neurological diseases. Therefore, it is immensely important to keep microglia healthy in both young and old brain. Our recent studies are focused on the signaling pathways that up and down regulate oxidative/inflammatory response in microglial cells. Our goals also include searching for effective phytochemicals/herbs that can provide therapeutic potentials to mitigate neurodegenerative diseases and aging. Microglial cells respond vividly to bacteria endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) which activate the Toll-like receptors leading to induction of the NF-kB transcriptional pathway and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide. Our studies show that some botanical polyphenols not only are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced NF-kB pathway but also effective in stimulating the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway leading to transcription activation of the Antioxidant Response Element (ARE) and synthesis of antioxidant enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1. We believe that our goals to identify novel phytochemicals targeting these pathways are important for maintaining healthy microglia to fight against neurological diseases and aging.

  • Alternative Medicine Market and Future Scope in China; Traditional Chinese Medicine; Naturopathic Medicine
Speaker
Biography:

Bert Little, Ph.D., Professor of Health Management and Systems Sciences, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville has an extensive educational background in analytics (mathematics, statistics, databases and probability theory) and population health (human biology, genetics, medicine, public health), and is a formally trained physical/biological anthropologist with extensive experience working with populations outside the US.

Abstract:

Jamaican Maroons are isolated populations founded by descendants of West Africans who escaped slavery and established free communities in Jamaican mountains. Maroon communities were established before 1655. Moore Town is the largest Maroon settlement, approximately 240 households and 1200 individuals. Anecdotally, Maroon migrants have a high rate of T2D in Kingston. A pilot study of T2D was done in March-April 2016 to establish baseline data, collecting information about T2D. Female heads of household were assessed and asked whether T2D had been diagnosed in the interviewee or any family member. Analysis of the odds of having T2D indicated that first degree relative with T2D odds ratio (OR) was 1.11 (0.33-3.76, p=0.88), diastolic blood pressure>90 OR=4.20 (1.41-12.55, p<0.01), and waist-hip ratio >0.85 (Fisher’s exact p<0.0001). Age at menarche was lower among T2D women (mean=14.0, 95% CI: 13.6-14.3) vs. non-T2D women (mean=14.8, 95% CI: 14.4-15.2). Logistic regression analysis indicated T2D individuals had: high diastolic blood pressure (OR=29.3, 95% CI: 1.79-480.04, p<0.02), high (>75 BPM) heart rate (OR=25.0, 95% CI: 18.7-158.9, p<0.001), age (OR=1.15, 95% CI: 1.06-1.25, p<0.001), and earlier age at menarche (OR=0.23, 95% CI: 0.09-0.57, p<0.002). Thus, women with T2D tended to be older, reach menarche earlier, and have: high waist:hip ratios, high heart rates, and elevated diastolic blood pressures compared to non-T2D. These findings are consistent with previously reported data except for earlier sexual maturation.

Speaker
Biography:

Armenia Nazar is currently working as Professor at Department of Pharmacy, University of Andalas, Indonesia. She has completed her Doctorate in Physiology and Pharmacology at University of Science, Malaysia. She gave her presentations in many international conferences. She is the Vice Dean for the Cooperation and Students Affairs.

Abstract:

A blood pressure lowering effect of scopoletin on anesthetized oxidative stress associated hypertensive rats has been studied. Scopoletin (10 mg/kg BW) was given to the prednison-NaCl (PN) and prednison-NaCl-L-NAME (PNL) induced rats. As comparisons, other groups of the same rats were treated with Tempol (17.2mg/kgBW) and saline.  The direct animal carotid artery SBP, DBP, MAP and HR were measured (Biopac Acquisition System MP150) before and every half an hour for two hours after drug commencement. Plasma NO was measured before and at the end of the experiment.  Data of BPs and HR were analyzed using three-way ANOVA, while plasma NO was analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s HSD-test (significance was taken at p<0.05).  Results showed that the animals SBP, DBP, and the MAP were significantly (p<0.05) reduced by scopoletin and tempol without any significant changed (p>0.1) in the animal HR.  The response of PNL hypertensive animals to scopoletin was greater and so the effect of scopoletin compare to tempol. Plasma NO of scopoletin and tempol treated rats also increased, but there was no significant different of average plasma NO between both hypertensive types. These indicated that scopoletin at the given dose is effective as blood pressure lowering agent, especially on the stress oxidative associated   hypertensive rats.

Speaker
Biography:

Che Noriah Othman is a Senior Lecturer at Faculty of Pharmacy UiTM Pulau Pinang and has involved in many research activities involving herbal, social and behavioral pharmacy. Her main interest is in Herbal Medicine, Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Malay Medicine. She has almost completed her PhD study in Clinical Pharmacy and will secure more research grants related to her field. She is presently collaborated with Universiti Sains Malaysia to conduct cancer related research and is supervising a few Master’s and undergraduate students. She is currently a coordinator of Research and Final Year Project presentation for the Faculty of Pharmacy. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member and reviewer of many conferences and journals around the world.

Abstract:

Introduction: Chemoprevention is a new approach to suppress, delay or reverse the process of carcinogenesis instead of current treatment that causes many side effects and also possibility of recurrence of cancer. In South East Asia, Clinacanthus nutans Lindau (CN) has been used traditionally as herbal medicine to treat various diseases including cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of CN has not been explored for cancer prevention and treatment.

Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the chemo-preventive property of CN extract on cervical cancer and to identify the compound in CN extract that has anti-proliferative potential using human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cell line.

Methodology: 500 gram of dried powdered CN was immersed in ethanol for 3 days. After filtration, the extract was concentrated in vacuo to give crude ethanol extract of CN (EECN). EECN with concentrations of 0.72-1.44mg/ml were treated on HeLa cells to get the IC50 value. The phytochemical contained in the crude extract of EECN were identified using GC-MS.

Result: Results shows that EECN inhibit the growth of cancer cells at IC50 value of 1.08 mg/ml. GCMS analysis of EECN showed that Lupeol, lup-20(29)-en-3-one, β-Amyrin, Linoleic Acid ethyl ester and Squalene were among the identified components of EECN. Lupeol is suggested as the main active compound that might contribute to the chemopreventive property of CN.

Conclusion: These results suggest that EECN exhibits anti-proliferative effect on HeLa cells and potential candidate to be a chemoprevention agent in anticancer drug discovery.

Speaker
Biography:

Nitsa Mirsky completed her PhD studies at the Technion, Israel, and her Postdoctoral studies at Stanford university. Through her long academic career she investigated anti diabetic natural compounds activity both in vivo and in vitro. She was the founder and president of Natural Compounds Ltd, a company that developed anti diabetic agents from natural sources. Dr. Mirsky has been a member of the Faculty of Natural Sciences at the university of Haifa, where she served also as the head of the department of biology. She supervised dozens of M.Sc and Ph.D students and published many articles in the field of diabetes.

Abstract:

The Glucose Tolerance Factor (GTF) is a dietary agent extracted from brewer's yeast.

GTF reversed glucose intolerance in diabetic animals and humans. We found that oral treatment with GTF decreased blood glucose and lipids and potentiated insulin action in type 1 & 2 diabetic animals. GTF also decreased lipid peroxidation in blood and organs of the treated animals. We also found that addition of GTF to diabetic rats immediately with the induction of diabetes, inhibited the development of nephropathy and retinopathy in these animals. In vitro studies showed that GTF increased glucose transport into adipocytes and myocytes, in insulin-like mode. When a combination of GTF and insulin was supplemented to the cells, a synergy between GTF and insulin was detected

Treatment of 3T3-L1 and L-6 cells with GTF increased the phosphorylation of key proteins along insulin signaling pathway, in a time and dose-dependent manner. Whereas GTF increased tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and stimulated the activation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK, it did not affect tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR). We treated CHO cells over expressing insulin receptor (CHO-IR) with either insulin or GTF. Whereas a remarkable elevation in phosphorylation of IR was detected when these cells were treated with insulin, any phosphorylation above control values was not detected when CHO-IR cells were treated with GTF.

Our data demonstrates that GTF acts through insulin-signaling pathway, but probably not via insulin receptor. Our findings present GTF as a novel oral "insulin-like" material for future treatment of diabetes.

Speaker
Biography:

Vandana Sankar has completed her PhD in Life Science from Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. She obtained her Post-doctoral studies at CSIR-National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (CSIR-NIIST), India. She is presently working as DST Young Scientist at Agro-processing and Natural Products Division of CSIR-NIIST.  She has published 18 papers in reputed journals and has received Kerala State Young Scientist Award in 2014 for her contributions to research. She has also presented papers in national and international conferences. Her major research area includes cardiovascular disease biology, natural products, green synthesized nanoparticles, etc.

Abstract:

According to WHO, among non-communicable diseases, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death in the world. Hypertension ranks among the first risk factors for CVD. The sustained hemodynamic load imposed by hypertension on the heart leads to cardiac remodeling and ultimately heart failure. Remodeling includes hypertrophy, fibrosis and functional changes. Pharmacological intervention in hypertension should be directed towards prevention of remodeling also. Ayurveda is a traditional Indian system of medicine. Despite clinical efficacy, lack of scientific validation has limited the use of Ayurvedic drugs. An Ayurvedic drug composed of crude powders of 6 medicinal plants was formulated by Nagarjuna Herbal Concentrates Ltd., Kerala.  The aim of the study was to scientifically characterize the cardiovascular response to the drug and delineate the mode of action. The drug was able to reduce blood pressure in SHR, which was supported by the finding of vasorelaxation in isolated aortae. Vasorelaxation was associated with calcium antagonistic action, thereby enhancing endothelium-derived relaxing factor availability. ERK and calcineurin signaling pathways were involved in vasorelaxation by the drug. The drug attenuated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis in SHR through downregulation of ERK and PKCε pathways, possibly mediated by the antioxidant property of the drug. Reduced expression of 3-nitrotyrosine in treated SHR was also demonstrated. Cardiac output in treated SHR was improved, and ECG alterations were relatively lower. Moreover, toxicity was not observed. The study is the first of its kind to extensively and systematically evaluate an Ayurvedic antihypertensive, and this will go a long way in their popularization and better acceptance.

Speaker
Biography:

Jane Namukobe has completed her PhD in 2015 from Makerere University Kampala. She is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry Makerere University where she undertakes Teaching and Research. She has published 9 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The study was done to document medicinal plants used in the treatment of various diseases by the people in the Northern sector of Kibale National Park in western Uganda. The required information was obtained using open interviews, semi-structured questionnaires, and focus group discussions and transects walks. Different medicinal plants (131 species) distributed over 55 families were observed to be used by the local communities around the Northern sector of Kibale National Park. The plants are used to treat 43 physical illnesses/diseases. The most used parts of the plants are the leaves. It was observed that the people in the study area have a rich heritage of traditional plants that are used in the health care system to treat diseases. These medicinal plants have contributed significantly to several disease therapies.  Phytochemical investigation on the stem bark of this plant led to the isolation of one new diterpenoid;  neoboutomacroin (1) in addition to the four known compounds which included, a phenanthrene; 3,6-dihyroxy-1,7-dimethyl-9-methoxyphenanthrene (2), asterol; 3-O-Acetyloleuritolicacid(3) and two diterpenoids; simplexin (4) and montanin (5).  Their chemical structures were established mainly through a combination of spectroscopic techniques.   The isolated compounds were evaluated for antiplasmodial activity against the chloroquine-resistant FcB1/Colombia strain of Plasmodium falciparum and some compounds showed good activity against Plasmodium falciparum parasite.

Speaker
Biography:

Pierluigi Pompei is an Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Pharmacotherapy and Sport Nutrition in the Dept. of Experimental Medicine and Public Health - University of Camerino. He is the author of over 50 international publications on peer-reviewed journals, several chapters of scientific books, has 1 international patent and attended hundreds of conferences and meetings.

Abstract:

Adverse reactions to food could result either in toxic or non toxic reactions, the latter being immunological and/or non immunological based. The immunological based reactions could yield in food allergies, IgE-mediated and via T lymphocytes, whereas the non-immunological ones are defined food intolerances. Ulcer colitis and Crohn disease show a chronic intestinal wall inflammation with altered pro-inflammatory cytokines balance. A higher incidence of both diseases occurs in North Europe, North America and Australia with onset between 30 and 40 years old. Common symptoms are diarrhea, meteorism, colitis, nausea, abdominal pain, dyspepsia. Colostrum is the milk produced 24-36 hours after partum. It shows a protective action, due to macrophages, leukocytes and secretory IgE and IgA and a nutritive function, due to the high content in proteins and minerals and a baseline content of lipids, glycids and calories (67 kcal/100ml). Seven female subjects, mean age between 40 and 53 (2 with ulcer colitis, 5 with irritable colon) were selected as case reports, undergoing Bioimpedance body analysis via Akern BIA, ALCAT test for food intolerance and subsequent appropriate diet. Noni Colostrum was then administered to them for six months. Diet following ALCAT test and Noni Colostrum administration showed a general evidence-based medicine disappearance of the gastrointestinal distress and symptomathology, perhaps due to an increased immunological tolerance threshold in subjects with food intolerance. Moreover, xeronines, contained in Noni Colostrum may strongly contribute to a natural boost of the immune system that may have reverted the clinical symptoms.

Speaker
Biography:

Rosa Lelyana completed medical school in 1997 and graduated S2 is less than 2 years of research in the field of coffee. She is a member of the ACS (American Chemical Society) on request since 2014. In 2011 she received an award from the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and University lecturer Diponegoro as one of the best level textbook authors of university medical faculty level Diponegoro.

Abstract:

Many herbal medicinal plants from Indonesia are used to reduce Diabetes Mellius. Diabetes is a topic area included in Healthy People 2020. In America, there are 1.4 million people diagnosed every year with Diabetes Mellitus. One of the causes of Diabetes Mellitus type 2 is obesity. The high cost of weight loss and side effects of synthetic chemical drugs cause most of the world community to switch to nutraceutical. The results of study prove that weight loss would improve by 10-15% risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Recent study indicates the role of herbal decrease of chronic disease incidence suffering. The weight loss of adipose tissue corrects response and minimizes diameter adipocyte abdominal size. Herbal one that has the ability for that is coffee. If we consume 2 cup of coffee daily could improve the immune response. Coffee is able to correct immune system (NO, IL-10 and adipose tissue). The other herbal plant medicine which could improve the immune response are curcumin; isoflavon; cathecin (tea-polifenol) etc. Herbal medicine could decrease the risk factor incidence of Diabetes Mellitus.

Speaker
Biography:

Nitsa Mirsky completed her PhD studies at the Technion, Israel, and her Postdoctoral studies at Stanford university. Through her long academic career she investigated anti diabetic natural compounds activity both in vivo and in vitro. She was the founder and president of "Natural Compounds", a company that developed anti diabetic agents from natural sources. Dr. Mirsky has been a member of the Faculty of Natural Sciences at the university of Haifa, where she served also as the head of the department of biology. She supervised dozens of M.Sc and Ph.D students and published many articles in the field of diabetes.

Abstract:

Cataract formation is one of severe diabetes complications. Hyperglycemia brings to increased polyol concentration in the lens, to glycation of lens proteins, and to elevated oxidative stress. The Glucose Tolerance Factor is a yeast derived material that decreased hyperglycemia and oxidative stress both in diabetic animals and humans. We studied the protective effect of GTF on the eye lens both in vivo and in vitro. Streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats received 15 oral doses of GTF. While diabetic untreated rats developed cataracts, the development of cataract was totally or partially prevented in GTF treated animals.

In vitro studies were done on bovine lenses incubated for 14 days. Half of the lenses were incubated in normal glucose conditions, and half in high glucose conditions. To one group of the normal or high glucose condition GTF was added. The optical quality of all the lenses was measured daily by an automated scanning laser system. The control lenses, whether with or without GTF addition, kept their optical quality. High glucose conditions induced optical damage to the lenses. Addition of GTF prevented this damage. High glucose conditions affected the activity of aldose reductase and Na/ K ATPase in lens epithelial cell. Addition of GTF decreased these destructive changes. The amount of soluble cortical lens proteins was decreased and structural changes were detected in lenses incubated in high glucose medium. These changes could be prevented when GTF was added to the high glucose medium. our findings demonstrate the anti cataractogenic potential of GTF

Speaker
Biography:

Gustav Komlaga is a Senior lecturer and a researcher of Pharmacognosy in the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana. He holds a PhD degree in Pharmacognosy from KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana, and another in Microbiology from Université Paris-Sud, France. He is interested in researches involving drug discovery with regards to identification and validation of medicinal plants traditionally used to treatment malaria and other infectious diseases, isolation and characterization of bioactive compounds form medicinal plants, standardization of medicinal plants and herbal products for the treatment of diseases. He has published more than 10 research papers in reputable peer review journals and is a reviewer for many scientific journals.

Abstract:

Malaria is a major public health problem in Ghana where it is treated, among many other diseases, with medicinal plants and allopathic drugs. Due to the relief achieved from the use of medicinal plants for the treatment of the disease by clients of traditional medicine, a search for anti-plasmodial compounds from the plants was initiated as way to validate their use. An ethnobotanical survey conducted in two Districts of Ghana, inventoried, among other plant for the traditional treatment of malaria, Phyllanthus fraternus. This plant was employed by a high percentage of herbalists for the treatment of malaria in the surveyed areas. However, despite the high level usage for the treatment of malaria, it had not been extensively exploited for antiplasmodial compounds. It was therefore selected for screening for these compounds. The aqueous extract evaluated against chloroquine-susceptible 3D7 and chloroquine-resistant W2 strains of P. falciparum  displayed remarkable activity against 3D7 (IC50: 4.07 ± 1.46) but was inactive against W2 (IC50 >100 μg/mL). It also showed cytotoxicity against human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with CC50 value of 31.11 ± 3.31 μg/mL. It was, however, selective for the 3D7 P. falciparum with selectivity index (SI) of 7.6. The organic solvents fractions of the plant obtained by successive extraction with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol were also evaluated against 3D7 P. falciparum. These fractions exhibited impressive antiplasmodial activity against the 3D7 P. falciparum (0.44±0.08μg/mL ≤ IC50≤37.92±14.50 μg/mL) with the methanol fraction being the most active (IC50: 0.44±0.08μg/mL).  A follow-up phytochemical studies of the methanol extract yielded the lignan, phyllanthin, and 5 securinega alkaloids namely bubbialine, epibubbialine, ent-norsecurinine, allo-norsecurinine, nirurine. These compounds displayed varied degrees of antiplasmodial activity against both 3D7 and W2 strains of P. falciparum with IC50 ranging from 1.14 ± 0.32µM to 59.00±5.43 µM.  Ent-norsecurinine, which was for the first time isolated from a natural source, was the most active (IC50=1.14±0.32 µM) against the P. falciparum W2 strain. Only nirurine and phyllanthin displayed cytotoxicity (CC50 <100 μM) against HUVECs. Apart from phyllanthin and nirurine, the other 4 compounds displayed specific selectivity for the parasites (SI>3.6). The findings of this study validates the traditional use of the plant in the treatment of malaria and also point to the need to proceed with the screening of medicinal plants used to treat malaria in traditional medicine which may lead to identification of new and or lead compound(s) for antimalarial drugs.